INT_MIN % -1 = ?

If you spend much time testing compilers, you’ll run into some strange phenomena even in apparently simple areas like computer arithmetic. For example John Cook wrote a post today explaining why IEEE floats have two different values of zero. Integer arithmetic is generally a lot simpler than floating point math, but it still contains a… Continue reading INT_MIN % -1 = ?

Compilers and Termination Revisited

My earlier post C compilers Disprove Fermat’s Last Theorem generated a good amount of discussion both here and on Reddit.  Unfortunately, the discussion was riddled with misunderstandings. Some of this was because the topic is subtle, but some was my fault: the post was intended to be lightweight and I failed to explain the underlying… Continue reading Compilers and Termination Revisited

C Compilers Disprove Fermat’s Last Theorem

[Update: I wrote another post on this topic that may explain the underlying issues more clearly.] Obviously I’m not serious: compilers are bad at solving high-level math problems and also there is good reason to believe this theorem cannot be disproved. But I’m getting ahead of myself. Recently — for reasons that do not matter… Continue reading C Compilers Disprove Fermat’s Last Theorem

Margin in Software Systems

Margin of safety is a fundamental engineering concept where a system is built to tolerate loads exceeding the maximum expected load by some factor.  For example, structural elements of buildings typically have a margin of safety of 100%: they can withstand twice the expected maximum load.  Pressure vessels have more margin, in the range 250%-300%,… Continue reading Margin in Software Systems

The Compiler Doesn’t Care About Your Intent

A misunderstanding that I sometimes run into when teaching programming is that the compiler can and should guess what the programmer means.  This isn’t usually quite what people say, but it’s what they’re thinking.  A great example appeared in a message sent to the avr-gcc mailing list.  The poster had upgraded his version of GCC,… Continue reading The Compiler Doesn’t Care About Your Intent

C and C++ Make It Hard to Read a Register for Its Side Effects

[ This post was co-written with Nigel Jones, who maintains an excellent embedded blog Stack Overflow.  Nigel and I share an interest in volatile pitfalls in embedded C/C++ and this post resulted from an email discussion we had.  Since we both have blogs, we decided to both post it.   However, since comments are not enabled… Continue reading C and C++ Make It Hard to Read a Register for Its Side Effects

200 Compiler Bugs

This morning I reported the 200th bug found by our compiler testing tool.  It is a new way to crash GCC.  The failure-inducing input is not pretty so I won’t give it here, but it can be found in GCC’s bugzilla.  Although the testing tool is now entirely developed by some excellent PhD students, I… Continue reading 200 Compiler Bugs

Nine ways to break your systems code using volatile

The volatile qualifier in C/C++ is a little bit like the C preprocessor: an ugly, blunt tool that is easy to misuse but that — in a very narrow set of circumstances — gets the job done.  This article will first briefly explain volatile and its history and then, through a series of examples about… Continue reading Nine ways to break your systems code using volatile

Is That a Compiler Bug?

It’s common for a computer program to display behavior seemingly unrelated to its source code.  Additionally, programs written in C/C++ frequently change their behavior when the compiler optimization options are changed.  This post is a quick guide to figuring out if the compiler is at fault.  This post was motivated by a blog post by… Continue reading Is That a Compiler Bug?