Author: regehr

  • Sid’s Mountain Backpacking Loop

    Last fall my friend Brian and I went on a short backpacking trip in the San Rafael Swell. We left SLC early, drove to Ferron Utah, and then followed a high-clearance dirt road to the rim of North Salt Wash, a wide canyon that feeds the San Rafael River. We dropped into this open canyon […]

  • Alive2 Part 1: Introduction

    [This piece is co-authored by Nuno P. Lopes and John Regehr.] Compiler bugs threaten the correctness of almost any computer system that uses compiled code. Translation validation is a path towards reliably correct compilation that works by checking that an individual execution of the compiler did the right thing. We created a tool, Alive2, that […]

  • Precision Opportunities for Demanded Bits in LLVM

    [Although this post was written to stand by itself, it builds on the previous one. It is authored by Jubi Taneja, Zhengyang Liu, and John Regehr.] When designing computer systems, it can be useful to avoid specifying behaviors too tightly. For example, we might specify that a math library function only needs to return a […]

  • Testing Dataflow Analyses for Precision and Soundness

    [This piece is co-authored by Jubi Taneja, Zhengyang Liu, and John Regehr; it’s a summary of some of the findings from a paper that we just recently completed the camera ready copy for, that is going to be published at CGO (Code Generation and Optimization) 2020.] Update from Jan 12 2020: Looks like there’s a […]

  • Helping Generative Fuzzers Avoid Looking Only Where the Light is Good, Part 1

    Let’s take a second to recall this old joke: A policeman sees a drunk man searching for something under a streetlight and asks what the drunk has lost. He says he lost his keys and they both look under the streetlight together. After a few minutes the policeman asks if he is sure he lost […]

  • Write Fuzzable Code

    Fuzzing is sort of a superpower for locating vulnerabilities and other software defects, but it is often used to find problems baked deeply into already-deployed code. Fuzzing should be done earlier, and moreover developers should spend some effort making their code more amenable to being fuzzed. This post is a non-comprehensive, non-orthogonal list of ways […]

  • Design and Evolution of C-Reduce (Part 2)

    Part 1 of this series introduced C-Reduce and showed how it combines a domain-independent core with a large collection of domain-specific passes in order to create a highly effective test-case reducer for C and C++ code. This part tells the rest of the story and concludes. Parallel Test-Case Reduction C-Reduce’s second research contribution is to […]

  • Design and Evolution of C-Reduce (Part 1)

    [This piece is posted in parallel on the IEEE Software blog. Karim Ali copyedited.] Since 2008, my colleagues and I have developed and maintained C-Reduce, a tool for programmatically reducing the size of C and C++ files that trigger compiler bugs. C-Reduce also usually does a credible job reducing test cases in languages other than […]

  • It’s Time for a Modern Synthesis Kernel

    Alexia Massalin’s 1992 PhD thesis has long been one of my favorites. It promotes the view that operating systems can be much more efficient than then-current operating systems via runtime code generation, lock-free synchronization, and fine-grained scheduling. In this piece we’ll only look at runtime code generation, which can be cleanly separated from the other […]

  • Floating the Dirty Devil River

    Floating the Dirty Devil River

    Packrafts are tough, light, individual-sized inflatable boats that people use to put together really amazing wilderness trips by combining rafting, hiking, and sometimes even biking. I’ve had sort of a low-grade obsession with packrafting since 2009 when I ran into some people in Alaska who were on their way to hike up and over the […]